Projects

Abandoned Spaces

These are spaces that are unused, neglected, deteriorating, and generally unvisited by humans.  With a little imagination you can picture them how they once were and how they'll eventually disappear.  If you look around and explore a little, you'll probably find similar spaces near you, each with a unique story of their past, present, and future.  Don't wait too long, though.  Once they're eventually gone, their story might be lost forever.

Abandoned Spaces Gallery

Little Italy

These are some of the streets, buildings and people found in the Little Italy neighborhood of Omaha, Nebraska.  This was once a thriving community of Italian immigrants sharing their rich heritage and their love of life.  Today's Little Italy bears only a few remnants of what was once here.  These photos are some of the remaining parts of this incredible community that you can still find in Omaha's Little Italy neighborhood.


Little Italy Gallery

Being Rich and Poor

This project is still only conceptual, but if it ever actually materializes it will be a story in photographs showing the lives of the rich and poor living side by side.  We saw the stark contrast between rich and poor during a recent trip to Savannah, Georgia.  On the same city block you would see rows of large, extravagant  homes built before the civil war right next to tiny shacks made from scrap plywood, cardboard, and discarded building materials.  Their residents have coexisted in this way for generations.  The contrast between the rich and poor living together in Savannah is striking.

Aerial Omaha

Camera drones are making their way into creative photography these days.  This project, which is still in the conceptual stage, will be a collection of drone photos taken in and around Omaha, Nebraska.  Things look very different from the air.  This project will be an exploration of what is possible when your camera is high above your subject matter.  Right now I'm leaning toward selecting interesting subjects on the ground and photographing them by drone over a year through each season.